Turbo Bearings

We like turbos at MotoIQ.  Why?  In the phrase made famous by Tim Allen, "more power!"  In order for a turbo to cram air into an engine, it has a pair of wheels and a shaft spinning at incredible speeds.  Depending on the size of the turbo, they can spin anywhere from 100,000 rpm (big turbos) to 300,000 rpm (small turbos).  300,000 rpm equals 5000 revs a second.  Put another way, if you rolled a compressor wheel on the ground, it would go about six football fields a second.  That's about 1.7 times the speed of sound.  Wrap your head around that!  The rotating assembly consisting of the shaft, turbine wheel, and compressor wheel encounter axial and radial loads that want to push the wheels into the housings and rub parts together.  To keep the rotating assembly supported and freely spinning, turbos currently either use a journal or ball bearing system.  There are variations on each theme, but we're going to go over the most common designs.  First, we need to discuss the loads they encounter.

berrings1 berrings2

Check out the rest of the article at Moto IQ

Mizu Advanced Cooling Systems

  When boosting the performance of your car, one of the more overlooked sub-systems is cooling. Effective cooling is going to keep your intake temps down, lubrication more effective and make the engine run more…
Read More

Garrett Releases Boost Adviser App

Garrett by Honeywell has just released its first App for the iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch.  The Garrett Boost Adviser is a free App that was on display at the 2010 SEMA Show, 2010 PRI…
Read More

Honda GEAR Concept Makes Global Debut at the Montreal International Auto Show

At today’s Montreal International Auto Show, Honda Canada provided the world with its first look at the new GEAR Concept Study Model – a vehicle that demonstrates Honda’s innovative approach to providing the automotive answer…
Read More